Christ's Glory, Not Mine

by science fiction author Andrea J. Graham

Christ is Color Blind

What does the Bible say about interracial relationships?

 

The key verse on it is Colassians 3:11 “there is neither Greek nor Jew, circumcision and uncircumcision, foreigner, Scythian, slave or freeman, but Christ is all things in all.” The bible’s only prohibition on who you can marry (besides stuff like someone who’s already married/unlawfully divorced) is 2Corinthians 6:14, “Do not be unequally yoked together with unbelievers; for what fellowship does righteousness have with lawlessness? And what partnership does light have with darkness? “

So let me state it plainly: in Christianity, it doesn’t matter what the color of the guy’s skin is; what matters is whether he knows Jesus. As long as you share the same faith, and preferably the same or similar sect/denomination, can respect and honor him as your head (leader), there is no reason at all you cannot marry someone of a different race.

I speak of marriage because the sole biblical purpose for premarital relationships is to find a husband. If you’re not ready to get married, you’re also not ready to date. I realize the culture pressures you to, but it’s better to do what’s right for you, rather than following the herd and entering matrimony with the emotional baggage of a string of heartbreak.

So what’s up with all the Christian parents who naysay interracial marriage between believers? The answer isn’t kind, but it’s most likely the truth whether they’ll admit to it or not. Basically, when they picture their grandbabies, they picture cute little babies of their race, not cute little half _____ babies. It’s a biological pull based on a desire to preserve their own genetic lineage, but that the fallen flesh has a natural bent towards such prejudice doesn’t excuse it.

 

However, as you’re to honor your mother and father, if they’ve told you not to date outside your race, it would be right to do as they request if you’re still living at home, though if you can broach the subject respectfully, it couldn’t hurt to discuss the issue.


In Christ’s Color Blindness,

Andrea Graham